One of the difficult things about the pandemic has been the closing of museums and galleries. Our technology is great, and online art sales have found new audiences, but there’s nothing like seeing a work of art in person to be able to appreciate its full grandeur.

Donald Sultan 1951 –

Donald Sultan spent much of the lockdown in Sag Harbor…not a bad place to have to spend some time…but he bemoaned the fact that the colors and texture of his works can’t be appreciated on a computer screen.

Sultan has always worked with tactile, industrial materials; like tar, masonite and vinyl tiles. His father owned a tire company in Asheville, North Carolina, and Sultan was raised to feel very comfortable using industrial tools and supplies.

New York Times art critic, Michael Brenson said, “His images are fresh and direct in part because he approaches industrial materials as if they were tubes of paint, feeling free to use anything as long as he uses it directly, in the form in which he finds it.”

Even Sultan’s silkscreens are textural, with over-printed flocking on rising 4-ply museum board and the nuanced surface quality that he creates is difficult to see on a computer screen.

His sculptures are done in Corten steel, a product was originally designed in the 1930s to help build railroad coal wagons. Its strength and durability made it a useful material to use for outdoor building and sculptures.

Sultan’s use of industrial materials to create fine art prints and sculptures of delicate flowers has made him one of the most unique contemporary artists working today.

Jonas Wood 1977 –

The work of Jonas Wood is very personal and resonates with art lovers around the world. He draws, paints, etches and prints his surroundings and is able to imbue his works with the feeling that he is sharing a part of his private life with the viewer.

His softground etching, Pattern Couch Interior with Mar Vista View, available at VFA, feels like one could be sitting alongside Wood as he draws.

Many of his works are glimpses of his Culver City home and studio and include the sculptures of his wife, ceramic artist Shio Kusaka.

Derrick Adams 1970 –

Derrick Adams’ work is also very personal. He grew up in a loving, close-knit family in Baltimore, Maryland and bases much of his work on the wonderful experiences that he enjoyed surrounded by family and friends and on the daily lives of the people in his neighborhood.

Adams has been living and working in Brooklyn and teaching and Brooklyn College and has recently opened an ‘invitation only’ retreat for Black artists in Baltimore.

His work is included in Men of Change, an exhibit at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, that looks at the historic and profound influence that Black men have had in politics, science, entertainment, sports, business, religion, and other disciplines.

Men of Change will be on display through January 2, 2022.

Please contact us if you would like more information about Donald Sultan, Jonas Wood and Derrick Adams work available at VFA.


References:
Michael Brenson. 57th Street: Jimy Ernst and others. The New York Times. May 4, 2014.
Maureen Feighan. ’Men of Change’ exhibit at Charles Wright museum challenges narrative of Black Men. The Detroit News. October 11, 2021.